Monday, May 20, 2024

Baby (2023) movie review and synopsis.

The documentary follows Huntt, subject and director, who is an Afro-Latino of Dominican and Venezuelan descent. Huntt is culturally and ethnically diverse, which makes her story relatable to a global audience.

We watch Hunt relive the lived experiences of her schizophrenic grandmother, her father who escaped ethnic cleansing, and her neglected sister. She speaks their truth, but does not regret their existence; it allows their humanity to shine through. Through Huntt’s exposure of truth and use of creative freedom, she opens the door for future black and brown creators to not be afraid to tell their stories. Huntt feels like her parents sacrificed a lot for her and her siblings to “grow up poor.” “This cannot be our legacy,” Huntt says as she takes on the responsibility of uncovering her past in order to move more purposefully into her future.

There are some painful scenes of terrible Cocaine Blues music and liberal white actors acting so well that you feel like you’re attending an Ivy luncheon. They shed light on the cyclical conversations they’ve had with white people, which is another aspect of coming of age as a person of color or brown in America. At first, it almost seems like Huntt gives these ideas too much time, but I appreciated that she dismissed their beliefs.

The vulnerability expressed as Huntt faces her pain is a revelation to the audience. Once she faces the pain, how much control does she have? Although Huntt was dealing with pain from family, friends and America’s social standards, she did not give up. It’s heartwarming and heroic to see her look at her pain and push through it.

As an audience member, I felt the new way of life take over my body: “Black women deserve ease.” Huntt is recovering through a beautifully produced film, and she/we deserve it (space, time and resources). Breaking generational cycles seems fashionable, but it’s hard work. Hunt’s wonderful direction makes the proceedings seem possible. While this is a work to reveal the illusion of meta-narratives, it is also an outpouring of love and truth, documenting a movement with a sharp eye.

Rebeca, Bebeca, Bebe, Beba is a sight to behold and a portal to collective growth.

Opens Friday, June 24.

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HomeReviewsBaby (2023) movie review and synopsis.

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