Sunday, May 19, 2024

Lynch/Oz (2023) movie review and synopsis.

For you young people out there, this was sort of a meme back then – some stoned so-and-so had discovered that in ways that were actually measurable (especially if you were actually stoned), images of “Oz”- it. and the sounds of Pink Floyd were synchronized in a strange way. As you know, the turntable coincided with several coils of the VCS synthesizer. The thing was, at that time and at any time, it never occurred to me to try it myself. I wasn’t that into Floyd and had been around long enough to realize that ANYTHING can be synchronized if your individual will demands it. Still, as I believe you can gather, I was eager to please, and I nodded fervently, and late that night, when I got home, I tried the exercise, just so I wouldn’t be a liar, and I was: to be honest , a little impressed.

Why did the sync work? Various reasons, none of which Pink Floyd had planned.

“The Wizard of Oz” is a work both archetypal and unique, and as critic Amy Nicholson notes in the first chapter of this multi-essay documentary by director Alexandre O. Philippe, its place in the firmament of world culture is almost an accident. of fate. On its theatrical release in 1939, the film flopped and was considered an expensive film. As with “It’s a Wonderful Life,” the film’s second life on television made “Oz” ubiquitous and beloved. In his chapter, “Kindred,” director and writer John Waters recalls seeing “Oz” for the first time on television in his hometown of Baltimore, Maryland, and thinks Lynch should have seen it first, too. this way, whether in Boise. Idaho, or Missoula, Montana, two of the places not too different from the ultra-American Kansas where Lynch grew up. (And became, among other things, an Eagle Scout.)

A visual artist by training, Lynch has never identified as a cinephile in the way giants like Scorsese and Spielberg have. In interviews, he has been known to give up much of the film’s history that journalists try to uncover, seeking answers to the multitude of puzzles in his films. But “The Wizard of Oz” is an influence he’ll definitely live up to. In one of the best six chapters here, filmmaker Karyn Kusuma recalls attending a 2001 screening of Lynch’s Mulholland Drive at New York’s IFC Center, where Lynch sat down for a Q&A afterward. There, he said, “Not a day goes by that I don’t think about ‘The Wizard of Oz.'” And references are scattered throughout Lynch’s films like stray seeds, from places and proper names (“Garland” is the name of a street and the name of a character in “Twin Peaks”) for her many revealing outfits and red heels.

RELATED ARTICLES

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Most Popular

Recent Comments

HomeReviewsLynch/Oz (2023) movie review and synopsis.

Chinese Film Chinese Film Chinese Film Chinese Film Chinese Film Chinese Film Chinese Film Chinese Film Chinese Film Chinese Film Chinese Film Chinese Film Chinese Film Chinese Film Chinese Film Chinese Film Chinese Film Chinese Film Chinese Film Chinese Film Chinese Film Chinese Film Chinese Film Chinese Film Chinese Film Chinese Film Chinese Film Chinese Film Chinese Film Chinese Film Chinese Film Chinese Film